#205 Inspect The Hull!

#205  Inspect The Hull!


in our last episode we headed out of
River dunes marina to Deaton’s boat you are to get this boat done at first glance the boat didn’t look too
bad it hasn’t been out of the water in three years although we have had the
bottom clean you know scrape by a dive or several times let’s take a little closer look
one of the things I did notice is that there’s a lot of these little white
barnacles and boy when I began in the process of removing them they are really
hard to remove I had read somewhere that you can
actually paint your propeller to kind of keep these little things from attaching
so quickly to it I’m gonna do a little research if you know anything about that
please leave a comment so let’s start our little inspection of the bottom part
of this book because that’s where we’re going to start one by one we have an
iron keel we have a keel to halt joint connection this is where the iron keel
attaches to the fiberglass hull that area needs to be managed and let’s see
what else is going on on the bottom of this boat when I bought this boat the previous
owner was simply completely unavailable to help us to learn about this boat so
there was this piece of zinc that was bolted underneath the bottom of the hull
and I was not familiar with that arrangement on the inside of these bolts
in the lazarette is the bonding system wires all coming together so I just
stuck in an old piece of zinc and then I put a hanging zinc connected to the
inside of the bolts after seeing it again
I contacted the moody’s owners group and I realized that there is a zinc pre-made
that I have just ordered with new bolts so that this can be the correct way and
I won’t even need the hanging zinc anymore another issue was this propeller zinc
was just put on a few months ago when I got the new propeller put on and it was
seriously corroded out so I also noticed that in another moody 34 from a picture
of an English owner that he’s got two of these inks on the propeller so maybe
that’s the way to go from now on put two sinks on the propeller shaft and then
also get this main zinc hull established so I can rest assured that we’ve got the
protection that we need while I have the boat out of the water I looked at the
original surveyors report I noticed I said the bottom good Jim needs to be
vetted to the scag not really sure what that meant so again I wrote to the
Moody’s owners group and they told me how to check to make sure that it was
secure and finally we’re gonna have to clean it
real good prep it and then paint it with the bottom pane after we do any repairs
that might be necessary so it’s been really slow going this first week doing
work because it’s been so hot there’s been such a high heat index 107 degrees
so I was able to work in the morning and you know close to sunset but it
definitely slugged the work down if some of the viewers are wondering where amy
is she’s enjoying spending some time with our new granddaughter which I will
be joining shortly after I get the first part of this bottom paint done you

33 thoughts on “#205 Inspect The Hull!

  • July 26, 2019 at 2:21 pm
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    My boat, which was in a slip at a marina, had bottom cleaning every three weeks.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 2:21 pm
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    you can do everything right and still have bad electrolysis from neighboring boats. You can save old zincs connect to wire grounded to boat and hang over board while in Marina. Cheap added protection. Just remember to bring it in before leaving or risk fowling in prop.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 3:06 pm
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    Prop Speed is what most people use on their prop, and perhaps the shaft. It helps a little bit. Check out and give Total Boat Paints a call about your paint. Get high copper content if you can. It looks like Ablative Paint, but maybe not…The Total Boat people are worth ordering from if you can order it into the Marina. Paint the zincs by the bolts at the edge to keep the zinc from corroding around the bolts on the prop. Some people paint the bolts too….

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  • July 26, 2019 at 3:18 pm
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    Oh total Boats has a prop antifouling for like 300 dollars less than Prop Speed.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 3:29 pm
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    Vinny,
    I do not know how true this is as I personally have not tried it but I’ve been told painting the prop with egg whites works well at keeping the growth off. You may want to research on it. Bruce

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  • July 26, 2019 at 4:26 pm
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    We have used Petit 1792 Zinc Coat Barnacle Barrier on our prop for several years and it has kept the prop clean. I have boat friend who uses this on his racing J105 and has never had barnacles. This comes in a 16 oz spray can. On our Westsail 42, this can of paint last 2 years. We rough up the prop with a green scotch brite pad and put 3 coats on. Takes about 5 minutes to dry. We make sure the rest of the bottom is covered for overspray. I have been able to get this paint for $16 – $20 depending on source. We do take our boat out each year, but we have been really satisfied. Fair Winds and keep up the great vids. Doug on WS42 Harmony.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 4:44 pm
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    ¯_(ツ)_/¯ Stay Cool.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 5:58 pm
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    Having an iron keel not well sealed near bronze propeller, and spending a lot of time in marina, will certainly contribute to eating up zincs at a rapid rate. But you can take comfort from that it's eating up relatively inexpensive zinc instead of your expensive propeller and critical keel bolts. (Marinas are a mess of stray differential currents–there's a LOT of different metals sticking into the water nearby and a LOT of boats plugged in with wiring at differing levels of "terrible".) Once you're actually cruising and clear of all that nonsense most of the time, the zincs will last much longer, though you'll still want to go under to inspect regularly.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 7:43 pm
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    In your intro you said you were going to Keaton’s boatyard to finish work on Yab Yum. Know that a boat is NEVER done.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 8:29 pm
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    I have a grouper zinc as well in addition to my shaft zinc and a bow thruster zinc. I use it to gage how my shaft zinc is doing. I use Pettit Barnacle Buster in the spray can to keep the prop clear. Keep an eye out for Blue Moon on the SW branch of Whittaker Ceek just left of Deaton. He's a racer you'll see go by on weekends and Wednesday nights. He has also a J24 across the fairway from you Jib'Irish. Bob's also a former Main Liner. Paoli was one of his stomping grounds.

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  • July 26, 2019 at 9:37 pm
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    There really is nothing to be nervous about sailing: Either you are sinking, or you are sailing. If you are sailing, no problem. If you are sinking, again there are only two things that can happen: you can fix the leak, or you can abandon ship. Only two choices. Once you realize there are only simple binary choices…there's nothing to worry about!

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  • July 26, 2019 at 11:33 pm
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    Nervous every time I watch but yet, If I'm an advocate for anything, it's to move. As far as you can, as much as you can. Across the ocean, or simply across the river. Walk in someone else's shoes or just enjoy watching your vlog's.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 12:08 am
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    Hey Vinnie, I think what you are looking for is "Pro Glide" for your propeller. This is the less expensive version of "PropSpeed" which is quite expensive. They both work fine from my experience. You can also apply it to your running gear ie; shaft, metal on rudder and any metal skeggs. It comes with a primer/edger which cuts into the metal and gives the anti-foul something to adhere to. Altogether it comes in three parts PropSpeed which I think might be the original product, costs around 300 dollars I think compared to the Pro-Glide which is a little less than half the price. I'm sure your marina has probably heard of it. It is in wide spread use in the Caribbean and Bahamas. I hope this helps good luck!

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  • July 27, 2019 at 8:55 am
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    Great to hear that you are making such good progress with your objectives. That video was really interesting looking at the details of your hull and seeing the complexity of the various projects that you have to complete before you and Amy are ready to set off into the ocean. It looks like you have a good two or three weeks work in front of you to get these jobs done. We had our boat out of the water for nearly six weeks last year to undertake a lot of work on the hull, rig and deck fittings. I was working on the jobs 8 to 10 hours a day for three or four days a week and we managed to get it all done before we launched. I had spent a day at the beginning of the work planning the sequence of the tasks and this was really helpful to ensure that I was not constantly taking things apart and having to put them back together to ensure that the next job was doable. Getting the project plan sorted made a real difference. Enjoy your time on the boat, it will be very satisfying when you have finished.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 11:34 am
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    The easiest way to remove those barnacles I have found is to get a bottle of muriatic acid, some heavy rubber gloves and some long "q-tips" and just dab some of the acid on the shells. They sizzle and dissolve away. then just sprite the area down with a spray bottle of water/baking soda mix. to neutralize. Otherwise they are a pain to get off ( including the calcium base)

    that prop doesn't look good. Very "pink" which usually means deincification and weakening if the metal. You should get that checked while you're out of the water.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 1:13 pm
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    I have owned a 26 foot sailboat for five years and have only sailed it once so far. I hope to sail it more this year.

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  • July 27, 2019 at 2:59 pm
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    Hi Vinny, I use an antifouling paint by International called Prop-o-Drev https://international-yachtpaint.com/en/gb/boat-paint-products/antifouling/trilux-prop-o-drev. I have also used it's paint on equivalent by International called Trilux 33

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  • July 27, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Getting it done

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  • July 27, 2019 at 6:26 pm
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    https://youtu.be/6qiGXLDMsBQ. Here you go. He does this for a living so he knows what he is talking about.

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  • July 28, 2019 at 4:31 am
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    Your keel needs rebidding. Very serious and dangerous because keel could fall off and you need to drop keel and check bolts from corrosion because your keel is iron

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  • July 28, 2019 at 2:06 pm
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    For anti foul prop coat see Dangar Marine on You Tube

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  • July 28, 2019 at 5:44 pm
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    Silicone Paint is what you are thinking about for your propeller, I really belive you have an electrical problem your boat seems to be eating zincs at an incredible rate. Could be an ungrounded or improperly grounded circuit.

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  • July 28, 2019 at 8:48 pm
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    Brave man doing a refit in July/August. I do mine in November/December. So much easier to work in cool air. No fogging goggles or sweat on your glasses, or bugs…

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  • July 28, 2019 at 8:57 pm
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    I used Velox version of high speed prop paint because the kit is half the price of Proglide/Propspeed. Multipart applied as directed. Primer adhesion to the bronze props and rudders failed and it came off in sheets within 3 months. Even if the failure was my fault, I would not use it again. I don't like the viscosity of the primer and paint. Too thick and left brush marks everywhere. Not good for a highspeed planing hull prop… my opinion based on my experience.

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  • July 29, 2019 at 12:15 pm
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    Propspeed for your propellor. Check out the vids on Youtube. It will give you around 12 months of protection depending on water temperature and salinity. Cheers Gerard

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  • July 30, 2019 at 12:16 am
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    Vin, can you tell me what zinc that was? I can't find it, and it sure looks like an upgrade over the big zinc plates we've been using on Antares at least the last twenty years. Thanks
    Erik Williams
    Antares 1984 Moody 34 Rock Hall Md.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 3:57 am
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    The "Works" toilet bowl cleaner will take off that stain along the waterline like you wouldn't believe. Just wipe on with a sponge and in a minute or two, it's gone with minimal work.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 8:42 pm
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    You put the main zinc on backwards the bulbous end goes forward , but next time is fine.

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  • July 30, 2019 at 10:19 pm
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    Check out the preparation used on Dangar Marine’s prop. https://youtu.be/6qiGXLDMsBQ BTW, lovely bloke, putting out lovely content.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 11:23 am
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    If the boat is at the dock and you are plugged in. The zinc's go real fast.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 2:26 pm
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    Nice video

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  • August 11, 2019 at 8:03 pm
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    For the shaft zinc to deteriorate that fast in 4 months, you have a stray current somewhere. Either your boat, a neighbors boat, or the dock.

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  • August 12, 2019 at 10:20 pm
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    Ty for this video. Do you have a walk thru of the Boat ? I can't find it .

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