Clean Your Boat

Clean Your Boat


Sure looks like a great day to be
on the water, don’t you think? Then again, when you’re into boating is there ever not a great day to be on the water? For the next few minutes I want to talk about
something that’s important if you want beautiful waterways like this one to go boating on,
forever. You’ve heard about it. You read about it. And, today you’re going to see how easy it is
to do something about it. Aquatic Nuisance Species:
Invasive plants and animals introduced into
marine and freshwaters where they’re not native and they don’t belong. Come on. Let’s head down to the boat access
and see what we can find.>>Ah, quite the contrary my friend Coming home with an empty stringer of fish
does not constitute a lousy day of fishing.
No siree, Bob! Yeah, it’s a little known fact that uh…
catchin’ too many fish can have an adverse reaction in males of European descent, ya know, which could lead to carpal tunnel syndrome.
>>Excuse me, Sir?>>Uh, how ya doin’? Just teachin’ my friend
here a little bit about anglin’, but… Looks like he jinxed me. Heh. It’s funny how most people call it fishing but it’s really angling. Heh heh, that cracks me up.>>Sir, I’d like to talk you about aquatic
nuisance species. You know, zebra mussels, Eurasian watermilfloil, hydrilla
and other invaders.>>Believe it or not… I know all about that.
>>You do?>>Yeah, sure. By the way, you know how the Eurasian
watermilfoil got it’s name?>>No, I guess I don’t.
>>This noxious weed became quite a
nuisance in seventeenth-century Europe because in invaded mill ponds. It was here that mammoth clumps of the weed
would break off and plug up the mills, thus foiling their operations.
Hence the name, milfoil. Now, as you were saying.>>Yes, Aquatic nuisance or exotic species, anytime they are introduced into
new places they can grow quickly, crowd out native species, and
harm fishing and recreation. And, once they start they’re almost
impossible to get rid of. In fact, if you are not careful
they can even end up here.>>What, in this lake?>>In this lake. And, you know how they could end
up in this lake?
>>Uh, the uh…>>It usually starts with boaters who
don’t know all the facts about how to stop them from spreading.>>I hear you there, which is why I’m one of the more knowledgeable
boaters you’ll find this side of the Nile, which I think happens to be
41,080 miles long.>>So tell me.
What sorts of things do you look for as you
trailer your boat before leaving the access?>>Yeah, I’ve got a keen eye for this sort of thing, That’s ’cause I eat a lot of carrots, you know. So, if I see any of that stuff on my boat,
I take ’em off. Get rid of ’em. You betcha.>>Let’s have a look. Shall we?
But, before we check your boat, any idea of what
these exotics look like? There’s hundreds of different names you know.
>>Heh. I’ll have you know, you’re talkin’ to
a closet biology fanatic. Why did I know that?>>Well, first you got your zebra mussels.
You see, they’re about the size of my
fingernail, and they are native to the
freshwater regions of the caspian sea in Asia, While here in North America, ya know, they were
first discovered, in uh, it was Lake St. Clair
near detroit. Probably came over on commercial vessels
from overseas. These little guys clog water
systems of power plants and water treatment facilities, cause
problems for fish and wildlife, and stink up those beaches, costing’ everybody a lot of money. Then you’ve got your Eurasian watermilfoil, a plant with 12 to 24 pairs of leaflets
that form dense mats that crowd out native water water
plants and clog waterways. Yeah, they spread from lake to lake by clinging to boats, trailers, and the like. And, last but certainly not least,
you got your hydrilla. it looks like you’re basic aquarium
plant with spear-shaped leaves that have saw-toothed edges. You see, hydrilla removes oxygen from
the water and causes fish to die, not to mention making shallow waters impassable. Any questions?
>>Yes. Now can we take a look at your boat?>>Uh, yeah. Sure. It’s like we’re good to go. Have yourself a good day.>>Uh, sir? Aren’t you forgetting something?>>Well uh…>>Knowing what exact species look like
is just the start. Here’s what you need to do. Thoroughly inspect your boat, trailer, and equipment
and remove all plants and animals before leaving any water body. Don’t forget those little places
like bow line, license plates, wiring, lights, rollers or bunks, floors, axles,
motor and trolling motor, transducers, fish nets
and anchors. Then, drain all water from your boat, especially
live wells and bait buckets.>>Yeah, lord knows I’m gonna need plenty of room in
this live well for those “lunkers.”>>Next dispose of unwanted bait on shore. Never release leftover bait, or for that matter
any unwanted aquarium plants, fish, or snails into a water body. And, be careful of bait buckets.
If you dip them into infested waters, they can contain zebra mussels you can’t even see. Most exotics die within a few days, but some
can survive more than two weeks out of water. If moor your boat for more than a day, make
sure you do some additional things. Either rinse your boat and trailer with hot tap
water, at least 104 degrees, Or, spray them with high pressure water checking all nooks and crannies around
depth sounders and trim tabs. Then, allow them to dry for at least five days.>>Aw, that was easy as pie.
>>It is easy! And it is important to someone who uses our
waterways to help take care of our waterways. Now, if you’ll excuse me I have to find somebody
with a sailboat.
>>Ah, why didn’t you say so? You’re talkin’ to the Admiral here. Ya know, over eighty-five percent of the
Earth’s surface is covered with water. That’s why I like to spend eighty-five percent
of my free time on the water. Is that a wacky coincidence, or what? Hey, I got an idea. I’ll go get a sailboat. I’ll meet you at Round Lake tomorrow. This is your basic 14 foot sailboat, so, as not to confuse you novices.
>>OK. So how is checking a sailboat different than, say, checking
a fishing boat? Very good question. Ya know, it’s a little known fact that the
sailboat has been around ever since the Aztecs invented the bed sheet. In fact, I believe the word Aztec translates
in English to “Wamsutta.”>>You don’t say. But, can we get back to business?
The same basic checkpoints apply for a sailboat. Remove all plants and animals from your boat
and trailer before leaving any water body. Here don’t forget to check the centerboard
where it retracts into the hull, plus the rudder and transom. Drain all water before you leave a water body.
And, wash and dry your boat and equipment the
same way you would a fishing boat. You got that?>>Oh hey. You don’t have to tell me twice. You know the human mind is a veritable sponge, and yours truly happens to have one labeled “extra absorbent.”
>>So tell me, Admiral. Mind if I call you Admiral?>>Hey! I’d be honored.>>OK, Admiral. I have one more thing to cover.
Any chance you might have a personal watercraft? Heh! Does the sun rise in the east? Look. If it goes on the water, I can get one. Don’t you go away. I’ll be back faster than
you can say, uh, zebra mussel. Yeah, being on one of these things reminds me of my youth. Ever tell you about the time I was in the Indy 500?>>Umm hmm, we’d better move on before we draw a crowd.>>Good idea.>>OK. You were just out running your
personal watercraft. Now what do you do to help stop the
spread of aquatic nuisance species? >>Well, I check for plant and animal life
and then I, uh, yank ’em off.>>Yes, but a personal water craft is a little different. underneath you have a jet drive system that
holds water and could easily trap exotic species and transport them to new waters
if you’re not careful. Here a few simple steps you need to know. First, don’t run your engine through aquatic
plants before leave the water. Push or wench your watercraft onto the
trailer without running the engine. Look under your watercraft and pull all plants from the water intake area. Make sure you check the edges of
the grate over this area. Now, simply start and run your engine for five
to ten seconds to blow out any excess water and vegetation.
>>Check.>>Turn off the engine and pull all
plants from the steering nozzle.>>Check-a-doodle.>>Inspect you trailer and other equipment
for plants or plant fragments and remove them before you leave the access. and finally washer your watercraft and trailer
to get rid of anything you missed or dry them for five days.>>I think I’ve got it.
>>You are a quick study. Hey, I’m smart, been told I’m ruggedly handsome, own a lot of boats and well, I love to fish. You know, you might say, uh, I’m a man! M-A-N>>Yes. Yes, you are. And on that note-
>>Remember your aquatic nuisance species: zebra mussels, Eurasian watermilfoil,
hydrilla and others. Ya know, as a guy who loves being on water we share a special bond and we share a responsibility to stop
the spread of exotics. it only takes a few minutes to do the
simple steps we just covered. Inspect your boat or watercraft at its
trailer. Drain all water. Get rid of unwanted live bait on shore, then
wash and dry your boat and trailer. If you’ve moored your boat in infested
waters, wash it first then dry it at least five days Do it for your country. Do it for your fellow man. Do it for your love of the water.>>Very moving. Kinda brings a tear to your eye.>>Yeah, ya know. Some people have a
way with words, and, others, not that way.>>And, there you have it. Remember, control the spread of the aquatic
nuisance species. And have a great day
on the water.>>Oh, hey, hey, hey. Not so fast… the, uh, Admiral here has several more vessels in his fleet. I’ll go get ’em, OK? Hey, hey, hey. Don’t leave yet. So what do you want?
A race boat, uh… a catamaran, uh… hydrofoil? Ah! How ’bout a canoe? [fading] I’ve got an innertube in the garage. [fading] How ’bout some water wings. Hey, don’t go away.

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