Luc Ferry – A sabedoria do amor

Luc Ferry – A sabedoria do amor


We know that we are
limited beings, we know that we are going to die,
and that those who we love might also, all of a sudden,
die. And so rises the issue of knowing the kind of relation we want to have
with those we love and might die
from one day to another. There are 3 ways of seeing
the loss of a loved being: if we are Christian, for example, we can think we will meet again the ones we love, after death. That’s the promise Christ makes us,
and I remind of the episode of Lazarus death, that says that love
is stronger than death and we will meet again after the death
of the ones we love. You can also follow
the Buddhist tradition, or Stoic,
in the end really similar, that says the following: we should never attach to beings, nor to things, because when we attach, we are subjected to the greatest of sufferings. Those who passionately love someone and attach to them is in risk, all of the time, of losing the bonds
that connect them to the loved being and become terribly miserable. For example, the wise Buddhist
is the one that practices compassion, but who never attaches. That’s what the Buddhists
call renouncing. We shouldn’t attach because when we do, it’s madness, because
we’re doomed, obviously, to separation. If you’re not Christian or Buddhist, the issue that rises is how to live with the ones we love,
and who will die, or us, who will also die. I believe that there is something really deep in that, which is
what I call “wisdom of love”. What makes us love
if we are finite? To give a small example
of what wisdom of love can be: I think it’s convenient to
reconcile with our parents before they die. All of us
have issues with our parents. If we don’t reconcile with them
before they die, it will be too late. This is the kind of principle
I’d like to think of for the term “wisdom of love”. It seems to me something derived from what I call, alongside with
André Comte-Sponville, wisdom of the modern,
a lay spirituality. An appropriation of the great spiritual
and existential issues, but one that takes place
outside moral and according to great religions,
be it Buddhism or Christianity, as in the example I just gave.

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