Raymarine & Victron Integration aboard a 32 foot sailing yacht

Raymarine & Victron Integration aboard a 32 foot sailing yacht


{ Seagulls and waves in the distance } { Music } Pilgrim is a 32-foot sailing boat and
she’s about to have a complete overhaul of her navigation and electrics.
This is quite a complicated system. The Raymarine side alone is quite complex, with new
radar, sailing instruments and the Axiom multifunction display. { Music } The first job Chris needs to do is update the Raymarine to the latest firmware. After providing
power to the Axiom and the initial setup was completed, Chris selected settings,
update software. This device has Wi-Fi built-in so he selected Check online,
connected to his local network and started the update. The download does take a while but the
Victron management app is included in the Raymarine firmware bundle version
3.11.42 that was released in November 2019. Once complete, the new Victron
app is installed. Previously you would have had to spend a lot of money and a
lot of time programming of a master control unit to make this work, so this
integration is a much more cost effective way of the Raymarine and
Victron talking to each other. { Music } The original power source was just lead-acid
batteries which were failing and had failed in the past. He’s taken the view
that he should move to lithium. Lithium is gonna give him much, much more
usable power. It’s gonna give him a more constant power supply. It’s just gonna be
absolutely brilliant for him. { Music } The heart of the system which we put in
is the Venus unit, which talks to the Raymarine unit, which is a great
advantage. It also has a lot of advantages from our point of view in
that we can control some ancillary equipment, which you see later on is
quite important. The other part of the system is the Victron MultiPlus. The
1600 watt, 12 volt compact unit which is going to give him all the AC power
he wants onboard. { Music } There will be six areas of the boat that
requires significant electrical changes and connections. The installation of the
lithium batteries. The cupboard containing the Victron MultiPlus and
the majority of the Victron equipment. The lead-acid engine starter battery.
The lead-acid bow-thruster battery. The stern where there will be new Raymarine
equipment including the new panel. And the internal chart and
navigation table area. { Music } The battery temperature is down to one
degree despite the fact the temperature here is seven degrees, so we now need to
try solve the problem of how to heat the batteries up on a boat, in Cumbria. Below
five degrees C. we can’t charge lithium batteries, the battery management system
will switch it off and it will stop it happening so we need to solve this
problem. We need to use any available energy to warm the batteries up before
we start charging the batteries. This 12 volt, 30 watt pad will be
sandwiched between four aluminium sheets to distribute the heat. It’ll sit at the
bottom of the lithium battery box, keeping the area warm. This thermal image
of the battery shows how a small amount of heat below the battery, slowly heats
the batteries dense contents, bringing it out of any low-temperature alarm.
Chris is installing a PT100 resistance thermometer between the two batteries
and wiring it to one of the tank inputs on the Venus GX. The venus device is a
little device produced by Victron that will talk to the outside world via
the VRM portal, brilliant if you want to see what’s happening with you
boat remotely. Or, in this case, what we’re doing is we’re sort of thinking out of
the box a bit and we’re actually using it to control heated pads underneath the
lithium batteries. After going to Settings, Relay within the Venus GX and
changing the option to Tank pump, Chris was able to keep everything within the
Victron system and engage the tank pump relay to operate in relation to the
PT100’s resistance. The Venus GX relay then engages a larger relay more suitable for
switching the heat pad on and off automatically. We can then use any excess
power source that’s available. Alternates from the engine or the
battery charger to power this heater which will bring the batteries up to
five degrees C at which points it will then switch over and start to charge the
battery. Both batteries will be wired in parallel
and connected by a Mega Fuse. Then there is a master switch and the power is fed
to a positive bus-bar under the main equipment area. Within the battery box is
the shunt and the old Victron BMV501 within the switch panel has been
replaced by the BMV712 Smart Battery Monitor. Within the cupboard the MultiPlus
has been installed into the boat’s 230 volt system and connected to the
main positive battery and negative bus-bars. Engines on sailing boats of this
size tend to be relatively small and so have small alternators. After discussing
how you can damage an alternator in our previous video, Chris is installing a 50
amp buck-boost between the alternator and the lithium system to regulate the
power received. A 15 amp Blue Smart charger is powered from the MultiPlus and
is set to a lead-acid algorithm to charge both the engine starter and
bow-thruster batteries. The boat will have solar onboard so a SmartSolar
charger controller MPPT 75 | 15 has been installed. The BMS is also within this
area and wired to the batteries. A 65 amp Smart Battery Protect from the solar as
well as the buck boost are connected to the over-voltage alarm cable within the
BMS. A larger 220 amp Smart Battery Protect that supplies the boat’s 12-volt
appliances has been connected to the under-voltage alarm cable within the BMS.
In the description below is a link to a blog that accompanies this video as well
as a link to the post within the Victron Community where you can ask more
questions and see the schematic drawing used by UK Marine Electronics Ltd
for this install. We hear the arguments about using your phone and your iPad, not
only for looking at the Victron but for navigating in general. The problem is
when you’re outside there and the weather turns really bad, the first thing
that’s going to pack up is your iPad or your iPhone. The Raymarine equipment and
navigation equipment in general, is marinised. It’s very, very rugged.
If you throw a bucket of water at it, it’s gonna keep working. At the end of
the day, without any power at sea the next calls gonna be to the lifeboat
so you need to know how your power systems are doing. You need to know how
much power you’ve got available. Maybe a motorboat it’s not quite as important
but certainly, a yacht on a long passage is going to want to know exactly how much
power he’s got available. { Music } I think he’s going to be pretty
impressed with the system. He’s used to the batteries fading away on the thing, is
used to the old instruments not being quite right. This is an ultra-modern
system it’s gonna work really, really well for him. { Music }

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