Stingers, Springers and Sand in your Swimmers – Free Range Sailing Ep 91

Stingers, Springers and Sand in your Swimmers – Free Range Sailing Ep 91


– [Pascale] As the water hyacinth started to get caught
up in anchoring gear and that of the boats around us, it was time to leave Rockhampton in case we or our
neighbors dragged anchor. (boat propeller clattering)
(serene music) With strong Southeasterly winds
predicted in the coming days from the direction we were
exiting the Fitzroy River, we wanted to get out as soon as possible and had flagged a place on Curtis Island, a safe haven from the oncoming blow. (serene music) ♪ If I stay would you even care ♪ ♪ If I leave would you even care ♪ ♪ Talk to me before ♪ – [Pascale] Our sail to the anchorage was a little faster than expected and the tide was still too low for us to safely cross the bar on arrival. ♪ Talk to me before you ♪ – So what is it, 2.4? What’s 2.4 plus 0.7, 3.1? What time is it now? 11:20?
– Yeah. – I think we’ll go in on three meters. That looks about right. Just show up one o’clock. So it’s 11:30 now. We’ll wait 1 1/2 hours. It’ll actually give us. Well, something under the keel anyway when we go over that bar. (serene music) Just as long as it’s not a repeat of the Carnarvon Fascine, I’ll be happy. (Pascale chuckles) (serene music) Have you got any idea of why
they call it Yellow Patch? – [Pascale] I’m not sure. (serene techno music) (transitions to lively salsa music) (water rushing) – So back there in the mangroves, I just thought I’d just have a quick look and I could see a hole
and when I popped in, I could just see his head showing out. He’s soft, eh. He’s molted so this is the new crab here, so he’s still a soft shell crab. (serene music) Well, Pascy, what are
you holding in your hand? – This is the lid from a storage tubs that are down the quarter
berth of the boat. When we got here yesterday, I was like, I have to go down the sand
hill because it’s really tall. How tall would you reckon it is? 10 meters? – [Troy] Yeah, probably a bit more. – 10, 12 meters. It’s pretty steep. It’s sort of high tide now
so even if I keep sliding, once I get to the bottom, I’ll just land in the water. (laughs) – [Troy] I want you to keep sliding when you get to the bottom. – Yeah, that’d be cool. ♪ And we might be angels ♪ ♪ In a makeshift halo ♪ ♪ Makeshift halo ♪ ♪ We’re barely people, ♪ ♪ Much less your saviors ♪ ♪ Makeshift halo ♪ ♪ We are not your angels ♪ ♪ No more makeshift halos ♪ ♪ Makeshift halo ♪ ♪ More than anything we’re strangers ♪ ♪ To the world we’re saving ♪ ♪ Makeshift halo ♪ ♪ My life is blue and yellow ♪ ♪ They’re just words pretending ♪ ♪ That they’re going to be heard ♪ ♪ What color is yours ♪ ♪ They’re just words ♪ ♪ Just words, just words ♪ ♪ My life is blue and yellow ♪ ♪ They’re just words pretending ♪ ♪ That they’re going to be heard ♪ ♪ Makeshift halo ♪ ♪ They’re just words ♪ ♪ Just words, just words ♪ ♪ You’re so sad that
it’s not even that bad ♪ ♪ They’re just words pretending ♪ ♪ That they’re going to be heard ♪ ♪ That they’re going to be heard. ♪ – [Pascale] The following morning, the winds had started
to increase to 30 knots. (serene music) With our anchorage becoming
shallower in the spring tides and the prospect of being
covered in yellow sand, we moved from Mirrool to a different spot closer to the creek mouth. (serene music)
(woman laughing) – In areas close to towns and cities, popular fish like flathead,
whiting, and Barramundi come under considerable fishing pressure but stingrays pretty much maintain a healthy population wherever
we go so we prefer them. After spearing a ray, the fight involves breaking its suction to the bottom and preventing it from regaining it. (serene techno music) Once we get the ray to shallow water, it’s important to cut off the
barb and to kill it quickly. (serene techno music) All right, as we are traveling around, we try and pick up as much as we can from whatever Aboriginal
people that we meet. And one of the things is hunting stingray with the spear as you just saw. Stingrays aren’t really exploited as food by a lot of people up here in the North but we really like ’em. Who do you think they’re like, Pascy? Crab? – [Pascale] Yeah. Yeah, they taste like crab. – Hmm. Well, that’s what we think anyway. So this particular stingray
that I’ve got here, without going into too much detail, what do we know about it? We know that it’s a male
’cause it’s got these two, what’s called claspers. Females don’t have that. And sometimes, yeah, what makes up a ray as opposed to a shark
because they are related, if you look on the top here, excuse the big gashes in the head, but I just want to knock its brain out as quickly as possible to
stop it from suffering, but these holes just behind
the eye, these are operculum. That is how you tell that you’re looking at a ray, not a shark because you have some people
will see shovel nose sharks but they’re actually
called shovel nose rays because they have these operculum. So just like any fish, they’ve got the gills on the underside, but of course, stingrays spend their life with their gills down under. So in order to draw oxygen-rich blood in to pass through their gills, they have these holes
on the top operculum. They can look around, they can draw in, they can remain semi-buried in the sand and still breathe quite happily. So that’s the difference. If you’re ever looking at something, oh, I don’t know whether
it’s a shark or a ray, does it have holes in behind its eyes that it can draw water in to breathe? That’s a ray. It’s not that it’s got a sting
on it or anything like that. That’s the main difference. So this ray here, we’re going to basically just
make an incision down here, take the flesh off, take the
other flesh off, and skin it and then we’re going to
hand it over to Pascale and she’s gonna describe
a delicious thing to do with your newly-caught stingray. So what I’m going to do, like
any fish before I process it, I’m gonna turn on my deck hose and I’m gonna grab this scrubbing brush and scrub as much of
the mucus off as I can. It just makes it easier to handle. There’s a line of thinking
that I’m coming around to that actually improves the flavor. If you can avoid that outer
mucus getting on the meat, you get rid of that fishy
smell and that fishy flavor. (scrubber rustling) And these critters have a
lot of slime on them as well. (scrubber rustling)
(water rushing) If you’re a happy yacht owner and you don’t yet have
a deck hose installed, I can recommend one, you’ll be
an even happier yacht owner. There’s a lot we use ours for: cleaning us, cleaning
fish, cleaning the yacht. (relaxing music) All right, so here we go. From that relatively small stingray, I’ve got quite a bit of this
meat absolutely bone-free, a little bit unusual to look at, but really tasty and fairly
straightforward affair. – [Pascale] Yum! I think I might make some
stingray cakes with it. – Perfect. Those Asian omelets you made
out of this was unbelievable. I’m sure the cakes will be just as good. (Pascale giggles) Hmm. – So that Stingray that
Troy fileted up earlier, we actually put that
in the pressure cooker and brought it to pressure
and then just turned it off. What we’ve come out,
I’ve put in the fridge, and what we’ve come up with is
this crab-like sort of flesh. The same thing, I brought some potatoes to pressure in the pressure cooker and cooked them for about five
minutes and then peeled them. This is gonna be the base
for our stingray crab cakes. So I’m just dicing out some parsley, finely chopping up some parsley. So I’m gonna do some spring onion. (knife rustling) I’m just gonna chop up two green chilies. (serene music)
(knife clattering) Chop up the stingray mixture as well. (serene music) We’ll put some lime juice in there. (serene music) So, I’m just gonna bring it
together as well with one egg. I’m gonna just add some salt. See if we can get a mixture together that we can make into cakes. (lighthearted music) (pan sizzling) – I need a fork. Let’s have a look. Mm! It’s not even distinctly fishy. Really mild-flavored. – [Pascale] Yeah, I’ve just gone with British-style fishcake, traditional potato and parsley. – Yeah, well the texture’s such that British teeth would
be able to handle that. (Pascale giggles) – [Pascale] It’s a bit mushy. – It’s Yummy.
– Mm. – It’s a tasty thing. – [Pascale] I wonder if
you put more egg in there, would it be more together, I don’t know. Maybe I just need to put another egg in. – Definitely. Well, I’m about to check the engine oil. Smell? No, not really gonna taste it, am I? Because we are getting out of here and we’re gonna ride the
tide in through The Narrows. There’s a cyclone hanging around. I think I’m being paid back for making light of the weather comments back in a few videos ago. We’ll shoot down The Narrows and I think we’ll stop in at Gladstone. What do you think? – Mm-hmm.
– Sunny. Sunny, beautiful, Gladstone. – [Pascale] Reef’s put on
hold for another few weeks. – Yeah, but we’ve decided that we’re gonna come back, haven’t we? – Mm-hmm.
– In winter time. Less cyclones, nicer weather. The people are nice. We’re just not gonna have a
chance to really do it properly so in our ever-evolving scheme, (laughs) it’s just another one. (serene music) – Hmm, just enjoying a nice cup of tea. We are anchored. We went through The Narrows last night on our way into Gladstone. – [Troy] How’d you enjoy coming through The Narrows
last night, Pascale? – A little bit nerve-wracking, and as you said, slightly terrifying. – [Troy] I think most people are just naturally terrified
about going through any sort of navigational
challenge at nighttime. – Ah, but here we are. We’ve come through The Narrows last night. We had the right tide to do it and we’re just waiting for slack tide now. We’re gonna head into the marina because there is a cyclone coming and we just wanna grab a few things and then, yeah, if the cyclone
does come across this way, then we’ll go and scoot out to a creek and get some shelter there but we’re gonna spend a couple
of days in the marina first and then we’ll make up our plan, we’ll decide our plan once
we know a bit more about what the low is doing. – [Troy] We’ll have our
plan laid out for us, in other words? – Right.
(both laughing) – Yep, all right, let’s go do it. (serene music) (transitions to tango music) (transitions to serene music) (transitions to tango music) All right, we’re tied up
Mirrool, we made it in safely. There’s no paint missing on our or anyone else’s boat. (laughs) I just wanna have a quick
chat about spring lines. We’ve used these poly-lines here. There’s hardly any stretch in these, the ideal lines for tie-ups
would be nylon, wouldn’t they? ‘Cause they’ve got some
elasticity built in. It looks like their
job is to stop the boat from going forward and
backwards, and that’s true. But also what they do is
they do act like a spring. So they’ve got a fair bit of
tension here at the moment and your breast lines are going horizontal so they’ll stop the
boat from going too far. But as whatever forces
are acting on your boat, these will increase in tension gradually, like a spring and actually slow it down and then your breast lines will limit how far your boat will actually go. If you don’t have spring lines, if you just have ropes
going directly from the boat at 90 degrees straight to shore, there’ll be slack until they’re not. So what will happen is
the boat will go out, get to its breast lines,
okay, those 90 degree lines, and then all of the load
will suddenly come on and you’ll get a real jarring motion. It’s not as big a deal in here because it’s a very
well-protected marina here in Gladstone Marina. They’ve done a great job
and there’s lots of cover. So the boat’s not
surging back and forward, but there are some places where you will actually
get a bit of swell entering into some harbors. I’ve seen boats going bam and just really shock loading
their breast lines, okay? The lines that are going
straight out from the boat. So the answer is to have springs. And even your other lines, if
you can run them at an angle, not at 90 degrees to the boat, you also get rid of a lot
of that shock loading. Sometimes you wanna have your boat, so if you imagine that this was the stern and you drive the boat backwards
up to a wharf or whatever, again, instead of having
lines just going straight out, you want them going from the corners diagonally and crossing
each other like that to make a spring. And then if there’s any surge,
they’ll be quite gentle. All right. So that’s it, spring lines. When you look at them,
some people set ’em up and they’ll just go, oh, I only need ’em as tight as I need to have it to stop it going forward or backwards but they do actually
serve a bit of a function where they act as a shock absorber so if you find that your boat is really shock loading and jarring and you worry about
ripping your cleats out, maybe just have a think about
the tension relationship between your spring lines
and your breast lines. Just ease off your breasts and
maybe tighten up your springs and just see if that gets rid
of some of your shock loading. It’s something worth
experimenting and thinking about if you’re new to boating. Obviously, old hands will be like (yawns), oh, I know all this stuff. Yeah, try that because
I’ve seen a few people that are springers, there’s
a lot of functions for them, but that’s a really important one. They are actually a spring. (serene music) – [Pascale] Thanks for watching this week. And if you enjoyed the video, don’t forget to give it a thumbs up. (serene music)

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