The Response Boat-Medium

The Response Boat-Medium


I am petty officer first class Eric Lyle here at coast guard station St. Petersburg. I am a boatswain’s
mate first class and I am a coxswain on the new 45623 Response boat-medium, RB-M for short. Some of the features that set this apart from what we used to use,
which was the 41-foot utility boat, are there are three navigation stations. Each one of these screens has the ability to control the radar,
the chart plotter, enter a course, look for contacts. The station back here, which is the engineering station, has a closed circuit television camera inside the
engine room that allows the engineer to see what is going on at all times. It gives them a clear shot so that if there is a casualty on board
we can go ahead and assess that and take the proper actions. The advantage of having a camera in the engine room if its rough out, putting someone down
in a confined case with hot machinery equipment posses a risk in and of itself. This allows them to go ahead and do a visual round without actually having to go down,
open up the engine room, expose the engine room to water, other environmental hazards and themselves. Here at Station St. Petersburg we cover all of Tampa Bay. We use
the 45 resource mainly for escorts and search and rescue. Tampa Bay is a big shipping channel. We cover
anhydrous ammonia tankers, LPG tankers, liquid propane. This is a great resource because it can handle up to eight-foot
seas. The 25 is only rated up to six-foot seas. However, the 45 only sits one inch deeper in the water. So we can go in
approximately into the same depth as a 25-foot resource but we can handle bigger seas. That gives us a greater ability to tow vessels. Because we can tow up to 45,
almost 80–foot vessels with this, as opposed to only 25-foot vessels with the 25-foot RB-S.

7 thoughts on “The Response Boat-Medium

  • February 18, 2011 at 5:49 pm
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    great addition to the fleet. may those boats and their brave crews save many lives 🙂

    Reply
  • February 18, 2011 at 11:47 pm
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    A day without the Guard is like a day without the sun.

    Reply
  • February 19, 2011 at 12:23 am
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    Too bad there's not a way to turn off the closed captioning. While necessary for the hearing the impaired, for the rest of us, it's annoying and distracting. Is there a way to turn it off?

    Reply
  • February 21, 2011 at 3:37 pm
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    @wavemasterdave
    I live down in Ft. Peirce, FL and the RB-M helped us get back to port one day. We were taking on water (not my boat, a friend of mine) and we hailed the RB-M that was just leaving the nearby CG station, and they helped us get back to port. It was an awesome day 🙂

    Reply
  • March 3, 2011 at 10:30 pm
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    @pastinson,

    Thanks for viewing our channel.

    To remove the closed captioning you can click the closed captioning icon (the red CC block at the bottom of the player) to toggle the captioning on and off.

    Very Respectfully,
    LTJG S. M. Young
    Coast Guard Public Affairs

    Reply
  • September 23, 2011 at 8:23 pm
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    Interesting. Almost no free-board aft. Must be intentional . The Coast Guard is kick ass, and I'm a Navy vet.

    Reply
  • March 3, 2018 at 3:02 pm
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    Interesting clip. Hi there, it's now 2018 is this first response boat still the latest? and if so many crew members would you take on a search and rescue mission? I'm writing a novel so any information would be much appreciated.

    Reply

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